RE

Welcome to the Religous Education Department

AIMS AND VALUES

“To produce pupils who are religiously literate and able to hold balanced and
informed conversations about religion and belief.”

Good RE should:

  • develop pupils’ knowledge and understanding of Christianity as well as other
    principal religions and world views
  • focus on concepts as well as content, within the context of enquiry based
    learning
  • explore authentic religious material, e.g. sacred texts
  • reflect diversity in terms of the changing religious landscape of the UK
    so that they are prepared for life in modern Britain
  • engage and challenge pupils
  • reflect pupils’ own experiences and provide a safe space for discussion
  • present religious belief as a real, lived phenomenon, not something exotic or
    belonging to the past
  • take into account the increase in the number of people with non-religious
    beliefs and identities
  • provide opportunities for personal reflection and spiritual development
  • help to prepare pupils for adult life, enabling them to develop respect and
    sensitivity for others

Skills in RE
Pupils should develop key skills in RE in order to enhance learning and this should
be evident across key stages:

  1. Investigation and enquiry: asking relevant and increasingly deep questions;
    using a range of sources and evidence, including sacred texts; identifying and
    talking about key concepts.
  2. Critical thinking and reflection: analysing information to form a judgement;
    reflecting on beliefs and practices, ultimate questions and experiences.
  3. Empathy: considering the thoughts, feelings, experiences, attitudes, beliefs
    and values of others; seeing the world through the eyes of others.
  4. Interpretation: interpreting religious language and the meaning of sacred
    texts; drawing meaning from, for example, artefacts and symbols.
  5. Analysis: distinguishing between opinion, belief and fact; distinguishing
    between the features of different religions.
  6. Evaluation: enquiring into religious issues and drawing conclusions with
    reference to experience, reason, evidence and dialogue.

Resources and Facilities
Resources and Facilities

Currently we have 2 dedicated classrooms which all have projectors and audio capabilities. We also have 30 laptops to share between the department.

Resources for all key stages can be located on our Learning Web which is available in and out of the Academy premises. It is very well organised to allow students to find the exact resource they need quickly and efficiently.

We run a gifted and talented club each week with a variety of projects based on the interests and wishes of our students.

KS3 Structure
KS3 Content: Courses
Year 7

Unit 1: INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION AND RELIGIONS

This unit is an introduction to the subject of Religious Education and gives students the opportunity to learn a little about each of the six world religions.  They will have the opportunity to reflect upon their own beliefs and values in the light of these studies.

Unit 2: WHAT IS SACRED IN CHRISTIANITY?

Students will explore the concept of ‘sacred’ in the Christian religious tradition.  They will look at the life of Jesus and its implications for Christians today.

Unit 3: WHAT IS SACRED IN HINDUISM?

Students will consider key questions such as: What do Hindus believe about Brahman? How does faith and belief affect the way Hindus live their lives? How do Hindus express their religion and beliefs? How do Hindus mark important events in life?

Unit 4: WHAT IS SACRED IN ISLAM?

Students will consider key questions such as: What do Muslims believe about Allah? How does faith and belief affect the way Muslims live their lives? How do Muslims express their religion and beliefs? How do Muslims mark important events in life?

Year 8

Unit 1: WHAT IS SACRED IN SIKHISM?

This unit explores the concept of ‘sacred’ in the Sikh religious tradition.  Students will look at the lives of the Ten Gurus, requirements of Sikhism and the implications for Sikhs today.

Unit 2: FAITH INTO ACTION

A two-part course allowing students to consider what is special in relation to a person and the qualities of a good leader.  They then study the life of significant figures both past and contemporary who have had a great impact on others due to their religious beliefs, lifestyles and authority.

Unit 3: WHAT IS SACRED IN BUDDHISM?

Students will develop their knowledge of Buddhism and what it means to belong to the Buddhist religion. They will consider the different rites of passages that a Buddhist might experience. Students will have the opportunity to think about the issues faced by Buddhists in multi-cultural/multi-faith Britain today. They will explore aspects of their own identity in relation to the way in which Buddhists demonstrate their identity.

Unit 4: PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

Students will consider key philosophical questions within the context of different religion/belief systems. Philosophical arguments relating to the existence of God, e.g. cosmological, design, moral, religious experience arguments will be discussed alongside ideas about reality, identity, dualism. Students will have opportunity to consider how religious and belief traditions engage with ethical issues such as social justice, good/evil.

Year 9

Students start the GCSE course in Year 9. Please see our information in the Key Stage 4 section for further details.

Assessment

Students will receive feedback on their work and progress at least once every half term. Assessments take a range of formats and include opportunities for self and peer assessment in addition to assessment by their class teacher.

KS4 Stucture
KS4 Content: AQA GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A 8062
Overview:

Students will be challenged with questions about belief, values, meaning, purpose and truth,
enabling them to develop their own attitudes towards religious issues.
Students will also gain an appreciation of how religion, philosophy and ethics form the basis of our culture. They will develop analytical and critical thinking skills, the ability to work with abstract ideas, leadership and research skills.

Students will consider different beliefs and attitudes to religious and non-religious issues in contemporary British society. They should be aware that the religious traditions of Great Britain are, in the main, Christian, and that religious traditions in Great Britain are diverse. They include Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism, as well as other religious and nonreligious beliefs such as atheism and humanism.

Aims and learning outcomes:

This course encourages students to:

  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as
    atheism and humanism
  • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings and sources of
    wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts and
    scriptures of the religions they are studying
  • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject
  • reflect on and develop their own values, belief, meaning, purpose, truth and their influence on human life
  • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global
    community.
Subject content:

Component 1: The study of religions: beliefs, teachings and practices
Students will study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Christianity and Judaism and their basis in Christian and Jewish sources of wisdom and authority. They should be able to refer to scripture and/or sacred texts where appropriate. Students should study the influence of the beliefs, teachings and practices studied on individuals, communities and societies.

Christian beliefs and teachings:

  • Key beliefs about God, creation and the afterlife
  • Jesus Christ and salvation

Christian Practices:

  • Worship and festivals
  • The role of the church in the local and worldwide community

Jewish beliefs and teachings:

  • Key beliefs about God, life after death and the Messiah
  • The covenant and the mitzvoth

Jewish Practices:

  • The synagogue and worship
  • Family life and festivals

Component 2: Thematic studies
Students should be aware of different religious perspectives on the issues studied within and / or between religious and non-religious beliefs such as atheism and humanism.
Students will also study religious, philosophical and ethical arguments related to the issues
raised, and their impact and influence on the modern world. Students will be expected to show their understanding of religion through the application of teachings from religion and beliefs. They will also be expected to make specific references to sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts.

  • Theme A: Relationships and families (Sex, marriage and divorce & Families and gender equality)
  • Theme B: Religion and life (The origins and value of the universe & The origins and value of human life)
  • Theme E: Religion, crime and punishment (Religion, crime and the causes of crime & Religion and punishment)
  • Theme F: Religion, human rights and social justice (Human Rights & Wealth and poverty)
Assessment structure:
  • One 1hr45 min paper on each component.
  • Two compulsory five-part questions will be set on each religion.
  • One five-part question on each theme studied
  • Each five-part question is worth 24 marks, with 12 marks for AO1 (knowledge and understanding) and 12 marks for AO2 (analysis and evaluation).
  • The structure of the five-part questions will be identical across all religions; marks will be allocated as follows: 1, 2, 4, 5 and 12.
  • In each five-part question, AO1 is tested in the first four questions; AO2 is assessed through the 12 mark question.
  • Up to three marks are awarded in respect of spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG) based on performance in the 12 mark extended writing questions.
KS5 Structure
KS5 Content:

Students will be given opportunities to:

  • Study relationships between religion and culture;
  • Consider moral values and attitudes of individuals, faith communities or contemporary society;
  • Develop skill in reasoning on matters concerning values, attitudes and actions;
  • Develop the ability to make responsible judgements on significant moral teaching and issues.
  • Consider the quest for meaning in life, truth and ultimate values;
  • Adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religion, philosophy and ethics.
AS level in Religious studies

Philosophy of religion
Learners will study:

  • Ancient philosophical influences
  • The nature of the soul, mind and body
  • Arguments about the existence or non-existence of God
  • The nature and impact of religious experience
  • The challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil

Religion and ethics
Learners will study:

  • Normative ethical theories
  • The application of ethical theory to euthanasia and business ethics

Developments in Christian thought
Learners will study:

  • Religious beliefs, values and teachings, their interconnections and how they vary historically and in the contemporary world
  • Sources of religious wisdom and authority
  • Practices which shape and express religious identity, and how these vary within a tradition
A level in Religious studies

Philosophy of religion
Learners will study:

  • Ancient philosophical influences
  • The nature of the soul, mind and body
  • Arguments about the existence or non-existence of God
  • The nature and impact of religious experience
  • The challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil
  • Ideas about the nature of God
  • Issues in religious language

Religion and ethics
Learners will study:

  • Normative ethical theories
  • The application of ethical theory to euthanasia and business ethics
  • Ethical language and thought
  • Debates surrounding the significant idea of conscience
  • Sexual ethics and the influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs.

Developments in Christian thought
Learners will study:

  • Religious beliefs, values and teachings, their interconnections and how they vary historically and in the contemporary world
  • Sources of religious wisdom and authority
  • Practices which shape and express religious identity, and how these vary within a tradition
  • Significant social and historical developments in theology and religious thought.
  • Key themes related to the relationship between religion and society.
Learning at Home
Career Pathways

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