Languages

MFL

MFL purpose of study

“A different language is a different vision of life.” Federico Fellini

The purpose of study of a modern foreign language here at Branston Community Academy is to provide an opening into other cultures. We feel that it is essential that our students build an appreciation for other cultures and learn to see the world from different perspectives as they develop a better understanding of their role as citizens of the wider world.

Through learning a language at BCA, we give students the opportunity to develop into competent, enthusiastic linguists with an appreciation for other cultures; who are equipped with practical language skills, allowing them to make the most of their experiences in TL countries in the future, as well as maximising their potential in a foreign language to pursue this academic study further in HE/FE and in certain careers, should they so wish.

We also strongly believe that the study of another language helps our students to develop other skills:

  • they develop communication and social skills as they express their views and opinions on a range of topics and issues;
  • they develop analytical and problem solving skills, as well as resilience and perseverance, as new ways of understanding and communicating a message are discovered;
  • they are challenged to maximise their memory and learning skills, as new language is recalled, recycled and built upon;
  • they develop a better understanding of their own native language.

 

“Language is the road map of a culture. It tells you where its people come from

 and where they are going.” Rita Mae Brown

 

MFL curriculum aims

Through the teaching of a wide range of relevant topics, the MFL curriculum at BCA aims to ensure that all pupils can:

  • identify, use and manipulate tenses and structures in three different time frames
  • use a variety of key grammatical structures they have learnt for real purposes
  • develop and use a wide range of vocabulary, allowing them to give and justify opinions and take part in discussion about wider issues
  • use accurate grammar, spelling and punctuation
  • listen to different forms of spoken language to obtain information and respond to this
  • transcribe words and short sentences that they hear with increasing accuracy
  • hold conversations, coping with unfamiliar language and unexpected responses, using appropriate forms of address
  • speak coherently and confidently, with increasingly accurate pronunciation and intonation
  • express and develop ideas clearly and with increasing accuracy, both orally and in writing
  • read and show comprehension of original and adapted materials from a range of different sources, understanding the purpose, important ideas and details, and provide an accurate English translation of short, suitable material
  • read literary texts in the language [such as stories, songs, poems and letters], to stimulate ideas, develop creative expression and expand understanding of the language and culture
  • write prose using an increasingly wide range of grammar and vocabulary, write creatively to express their own ideas and opinions, and translate short written text accurately into the foreign language.

 

“Learning another language is not only learning different words for the same things, but learning another way to think about things.” Flora Lewis

Resources and Facilities

We have 4 designated MFL classrooms, all equipped with projector and whiteboard. In addition, we have two sets of laptops which can be booked out for use with any MFL class, as well as a bank of iPads. We also have a growing library of DVDs.

KS3 French

We utilise a mixture of bought in and bespoke resources to deliver our KS3 curriculum. A website called Eduschemes is the main hub of our core content. This contains three progressive programmes of learning to develop sustainable knowledge throughout Key Stage 3. Lessons heavily pupil activity based so pupils are consistently on-task. With activities related to today’s fast-paced technological world, and differentiation built into every lesson, all pupils are challenged.

Topics covered include:

Year 7:

Unit 1 - Self (Meeting new people, making new friends)

Unit 2 - Family (Self-reflection, similarities and differences)

Unit 3 - School (Similarities and differences between English/French school systems, routines and ethos)

Unit 4 - Free time (Well-being, differences in preferences of sports)

Unit 5 - In the TL country (Healthy living, lifestyle choices, French healthcare system, social conventions (restaurant, shopping) when travelling abroad, currency, culinary differences, metric v imperial)

Year 8:

Unit 6- Food and drink (Differences in routines, lifestyle choice)

Unit 7 - Local Area (Differences in French/English agglomerations)

Unit 8 - Holidays (Francoscope holiday habits)

Unit 9 - TV and films (French viewing habits, lifestyle, pros and cons TV responsible viewing)

Unit 10 - Jobs and future (Self-reflection on skills required for job specs Genders – male/female with jobs French qualifications system – GCSEs/A level)

In the single lesson we teach our phonics course, Planètes Phoniques as well as working on speaking and writing skills.
Homework is mainly learning and we have a weekly vocabulary test. Students are issued with a vocabulary booklet in Y7 with the lists of words to be learnt.
At the end of a sequence of lessons we do the Interim Assessment where students bring together what they have learnt up to that point in the unit and produce a longer piece of writing which is marked by the teacher using feedback codes and given a Branston Level. Students correct mistakes and give their own feedback on the piece of work. All assessments are done in Assessment booklets which are kept at school but student grades are recorded in a tracker which is stuck in exercise books so students and parents can monitor progress in different MFL skill areas.
At the end of each unit students are assessed in two of the four skills (reading and writing or listening and speaking) and given a Branston Level and feedback and deep marking is done on either the writing or speaking.

KS3 German

KS3 – 1 year

Y8

In Y8 a group of linguists will study German

We have 4 lessons in Y8

The following 5 units are studied in Y8:

Unit 1 – Self

Unit 2 – Family

Unit 3 – Free Time

Unit 4 – School

Unit 5 – Out and about

Homework is mainly learning and we have a weekly vocabulary test. Students are issued with a vocabulary booklet in Y8 with the lists of words to be learnt.

At the end of a sequence of lessons we do the Interim Assessment where students bring together what they have learnt up to that point in the unit and produce a longer piece of writing which is marked by the teacher using feedback codes and given a Branston Level. Students correct mistakes and give their own feedback on the piece of work. All assessments are done in Assessment booklets which are kept at school but student grades are recorded in a tracker which is stuck in exercise books so students and parents can monitor progress in different MFL skill areas.

At the end of each unit students are assessed in some of the skills skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) and given a Branston Level and feedback and deep marking is done on either the writing or speaking.

KS4 French

At Branston our GCSE course from September 2018 starting with Y9 changed from two and a half years to three years. This is in response to the demands of the New GCSE and top-heavy content in the syllabus.
In total 8 Modules are studied and the breakdown of the modules is as follows:

Theme: Identity and culture

SMSC
Module 1:● Who am I?: relationships; when I was younger; what my friends and family are like; what makes a good friend; interests; socialising with friends and family; role models Reflecting on relationships, case studies on influential people, famous people in past
Module 2:● Daily life: customs and everyday life; food and drink; shopping; social media and technology (use of, advantages and disadvantages) Regional sporting differences, changes in reading habits over time, Bandes dessinées, Cannes film festival
Module 3:● Cultural life: celebrations and festivals; reading; music; sport; film and television Different routines (Senegal), shopping habits, Francoscope festivals, civil partnerships and same-sex marriage, traditions,

 

Theme: Local area, holiday and travel

SMSC
Module 4:● local areas: preferences; experiences; destinations ● Town, region and country: weather; places to see; things to do Studying regions in Francophonie, social interaction as tourist, widening horizons, climate change, climate in francophonie, civil service, community projects and social responsibilities
Module 5:● Travel and tourist transactions: travel and accommodation; asking for help and dealing with problems; directions; eating out; shopping Booking hotels, tourist interactions, looking more closely at menus in francophonie
Theme: School  
Module 6:● What school is like: school types; school day; subjects; rules and pressures; celebrating success  ● School activities: school trips; events and exchanges School rules, purpose of exchanges, cultural benefits

 

Theme: Future aspirations, study and work

SMSC
Module 7:● Using languages beyond the classroom: forming relationships; travel; employment ● Ambitions: further study; volunteering; training  ● Work: jobs; careers and professions Use of languages in the job market, famous people who speak different languages, applying for jobs in francophonie

Theme: International and global dimension

Module 8:● Bringing the world together: sports events; music events; campaigns and good causes ● Environmental issues: being ‘green’; access to natural resources Human rights, global issues

Assessment is once again done in assessment booklets and at the end of each module a GCSE Grade from 9-1 is given for reading, writing and listening and possible speaking.

In addition, in Y10 and 11 a weekly listening task is given for homework in addition to learning for vocabulary tests.

KS4 German

In total 8 Modules are studied and the breakdown of the modules is as follows:

Theme – Identity and culture

Module 2: Cultural life: celebrations and festivals; reading; music; sport; film and television

Module 3: Who am I?: relationships; when I was younger; what my friends and family are like; what makes a good friend; interests; socialising with friends and family; role models

 

Theme: School

Module 1:

  • What school is like: school types; school day; subjects; rules and pressures; celebrating success
  • School activities: school trips, events and exchanges

 

Theme: Identity and culture

Module 4. Daily life: customs and everyday life; food and drink; shopping; social media and technology (use of, advantages and disadvantages)

 

Theme: Local area, holiday and travel

Module 5:

  • Holidays: preferences, experiences and destinations
  • Travel and tourist transactions: travel and accommodation; asking for help and dealing with problems; directions; eating out; shopping

Module 6: Town, region and country: weather; places to see; things to do

 

Theme: Future aspirations, study and work

Module 7

  • Using languages beyond the classroom: forming relationships; travel; employment
  • Ambitions: further study; volunteering; training
  • Work: jobs, careers and professions

 

Theme: International and global dimension

Module 8

  • Bringing the world together: sports events; music events; campaigns and good causes
  • Environmental issues: being ‘green’; access to natural resources

Assessment is once again done in assessment booklets and at the end of each module a GCSE Grade from 9-1 is given for reading, writing and listening and possible speaking.

In addition, in Y10 and 11 a weekly listening task is given for homework in addition to learning for vocabulary tests.

KS5 French

This is a 2 year course. Students will study the following topics for the speaking exam and the reading/writing and listening exam. In the speaking exam they must also research an aspect of France and present it and discuss it. This is known as the ‘IRP’ (Independent research Project)

The changing nature of family (La famille en voie de changement

  • Grands-parents, parents et enfants – soucis et problèmes
  • Monoparentalité, homoparentalité, familles recomposées
  • La vie de couple – nouvelles tendances

The 'cyber-society' (La « cyber-société »)

  • Qui sont les cybernautes ?
  • Comment la technologie facilite la vie quotidienne
  • Quels dangers la « cyber-société » pose-t-elle ?

The place of voluntary work (Le rôle du bénévolat)

  • Qui sont et que font les bénévoles ?
  • Le bénévolat – quelle valeur pour ceux qui sont aidés ?
  • Le bénévolat – quelle valeur pour ceux qui aident ?

Positive features of a diverse society (Les aspects positifs d'une société diverse)

  • L'enrichissement dû à la mixité ethnique
  • Diversité, tolérance et respect
  • Diversité – un apprentissage pour la vie

Life for the marginalised (Quelle vie pour les marginalisés ? )

  • Qui sont les marginalisés ?
  • Quelle aide pour les marginalisés ?
  • Quelles attitudes envers les marginalisés ?

How criminals are treated (Comment on traite les criminels)

  • Quelles attitudes envers la criminalité ?
  • La prison – échec ou succès ?
  • D'autres sanctions

A culture proud of its heritage (Une culture fière de son patrimoine)

  • Le patrimoine sur le plan national, régional et local
  • Comment le patrimoine reflète la culture
  • Le patrimoine et le tourisme

Contemporary francophone music (La musique francophone contemporaine)

  • La diversité de la musique francophone contemporaine
  • Qui écoute et apprécie cette musique ?
  • Comment sauvegarder cette musique ?

Cinema: the 7th art form (Cinéma : le septième art)

  • Pourquoi le septième art ?
  • Le cinéma – une passion nationale ?
  • Evolution du cinéma – les grandes lignes

Teenagers, the right to vote and political commitment (Les ados, le droit de vote et l'engagement politique)

  • Pour ou contre le droit de vote ?
  • Les ados et l'engagement politique – motivés ou démotivés ?
  • Quel avenir pour la politique ?

Demonstrations, strikes – who holds the power? (manifestations, grèves – à qui le pouvoir ?)

  • Le pouvoir des syndicats
  • Manifestations et grèves – sont-elles efficaces ?
  • Attitudes différentes envers ces tensions politiques

Politics and immigration (La politique et l'immigration)

  • Solutions politiques à la question de l'immigration
  • L'immigration et les partis politiques
  • L'engagement politique chez les immigrés

In addition students will write 2 essays of approximately 300 words in length in French on the following for the writing exam:

Novel – ‚l‘étranger‘ by Albert Camus
Film – ‘La Haine’ by Mathieu Kassovicz

KS5 German

This is a 2 year course. Students will study the following topics for the speaking exam and the reading/writing and listening exam. In the speaking exam they must also research an aspect of Germany and present it and discuss it. This is known as the ‘IRP’ (Independent research Project)

3.1.1 Aspects of German-speaking society
Students may study all sub-themes in relation to any German-speaking country or countries. The changing state of the family (Familie im Wandel)

• Beziehungen innerhalb der Familie
• Partnerschaft und Ehe
• Verschiedene Familienformen

The digital world (Die digitale Welt)
• Das Internet
• Soziale Netzwerke
• Die Digitalisierung der Gesellschaft

Youth culture: fashion and trends, music, television (Jugendkultur: Mode, Musik und Fernsehen)
• Mode und Image
• Die Bedeutung der Musik für Jugendliche
• Die Rolle des Fernsehens

Artistic culture in the German-speaking world
• Festivals and traditions (Feste und Traditionen)
• Feste und Traditionen – ihre Wurzeln und Ursprünge
• Feste und Traditionen – ihre soziale und wirtschaftliche Bedeutung heute
• Vielfältige Feste und Traditionen in verschiedenen Regionen

Art and architecture (Kunst und Architektur)
• Künstler und Architekten
• Kunst und Architektur im Alltag
• Kunst und Architektur – Vergangenheit, Gegenwart, Zukunft

Cultural life in Berlin, past and present (Das Berliner Kulturleben damals und heute)
• Berlin – geprägt durch seine Geschichte
• Theater, Musik und Museen in Berlin
• Die Vielfalt innerhalb der Bevölkerung Berlins

Multiculturalism in German-speaking society
• Immigration (Einwanderung)
• Die Gründe für Migration
• Vor- und Nachteile der Einwanderung

Migrationspolitik
• Integration (Integration)
• Maßnahmen zur Integration
• Hindernisse für die Integration

Racism (Rassismus)
• Die Opfer des Rassismus
• Die Ursprünge des Rassismus
• Der Kampf gegen Rassismus

Aspects of political life in the German-speaking world
• Germany and the European Union (Deutschland und die Europaïsche Union)
• Die Rolle Deutschlands in Europa
• Vor- und Nachteile der EU für Deutschland
• Die Auswirkungen der EU-Erweiterung auf Deutschland

Politics and youth (Die Politik und die Jugend)
• Politisches Engagement Jugendlicher
• Schwerpunkte der Jugendpolitik
• Werte und Ideale

German re-unification and its consequences (Die Wiedervereinigung und ihre Folgen)
• Friedliche Revolution in der DDR
• Die Wiedervereinigung – Wunsch und Wirklichkeit
• Alte und neue Bundesländer – Kultur und Identität

In addition students will write 2 essays of approximately 300 words in length in German on the following for the writing exam:

Play – ‚Der Besuch der alten Dame‘ by Friedrich Dürrenmatt
Film – ‘Good-Bye Lenin’ by Wolfgang Becker

Learning at Home
Supporting Learning at Home

Homework is mainly learning and we have a weekly vocabulary test. Students are issued with a vocabulary booklet in Y7 with the lists of words to be learnt.
A couple of weeks before their assessments students will be given homework time to learn for their assessments.
In addition, in Y10 and 11 a weekly listening task is given for homework in addition to learning for vocabulary tests.

We are often asked for strategies for learning vocabulary or a draft for an assessment, whether that be speaking or listening. As well as using the Website ‘Quizlet’, below are ideas for learning words and drafts. It is important that you practise and see what works for you.

Quizlet instructions

Some ideas for remembering words

1. We tend to remember the 1st and last of a list. So chunk learning. If you have a list of 15 words to remember, the 1st and last = 2 words. If you sub-divide the list into 3 sets of 5, there are now 3 firsts and 3 lasts = 6 words

2. Things that are surprising, odd, or don’t fit a pattern (one-offs) tend to get remembered.

3. We tend to remember patterns, so if you have a list of words to learn, re-order them into groups, link them, colour code or highlight them.

4. Bland or normal things tend to be forgotten, so you have to think of a way to make them memorable. E.g. make a personal connection to something, draw a picture next to it (visual prompts reinforce memory), make up a story with that word in it, do a bit of acting with that word (probably on your own).

5. Make up a simple but memorable Story :
“cup” “bird” “dark” “paper” “ferret”
“How I lost my Merit Slips”
I took my cup and threw it at the bird which was flying about the room. But --- I missed and hit the light-bulb, now I couldn’t see a thing. In the blackness I could hear paper rustling ---- my merit slips were being eaten ! “Merit” – “Ferret”.

6. The LinkWord Technique
The LinkWord technique uses an image to link a word in one language with a word in another language. The following are examples of use of the LinkWord technique:
English:French vocabulary
rug/carpet - tapis - image of an ornate oriental carpet with
a tap as the central design woven in
chrome thread

grumpy - grognon - a grumpy man groaning with irritation

to tease - taquiner - a wife teasing her husband as she takes in the washing.

Memory is all about making a connection. The links/connections are known as ‘pegs’.
Whatever causes a link is called a ‘trigger’. So the key to memory is triggering a peg.

Triggers can be a place as well. Change your learning place. Face a different way. Sit on a chair/bed. All of these different places can also stimulate a trigger. If something isn’t sticking in your mind, you aren’t stimulating your brain enough to make a trigger. Switch yourself back on by changing place or activity (come back to what you were trying to do a little later). When you first meet a word, think about which page and exercise it was, where you were at the time when you first saw it, to create a trigger.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

We remember:
60% of what we do
50% of what we say
40% of what we see
30% of what we hear
20% of what we read
90% of a mix of the above

Mixing the above styles is called “ multi-layering. “

Examples of strategies to use the above styles:
1. Muttering ---- talking yourself through what you are doing
2. Coaching/talking to someone else
3. Recording what you are doing and listening back to it
4. Acting out what you’re learning

Some suggested strategies for learning a draft :

1. Speak and record it – listen back on phone/MP3 Player

2. Record an English version ; Listen to it, and write it down in French/German/Spanish.

3. Highlight key language on your draft – verb/verb, subordinate clauses, tenses, possibly colour coding, using visuals. (Fig.4)

4. Liken it to script of a play --- give your script to someone else ; you read it back, and when you ‘break down’, they prompt you.

5. Do an English version – and do it in ‘German English’ or ‘French/English’ word order – e.g. “In the future will I around the world travel” (German). “I there go” (French). Use this to learn with.

6. Split each paragraph into bite-size chunks. (Fig 2)

7. Do your cue card last and use it to plug any gaps.

8. Highlight words on your draft that you struggle to remember (Fig. 3)

9. Re-write bits of your draft from memory.

10. At home learn a different bit in a different location to make a ‘peg’ in your brain. OR …… cut bits up/rewrite on sticky labels and put them in different locations.

11. Highlight each paragraph with a different pattern/colour.(Fig. 1)

12. When you get frustrated STOP! You will not learn anything. Return to it when you are calmer.

13. Understand what you are learning, otherwise it is just foreign words/sounds on a page.

14. Draw pictures on your draft every so often which may or may not refer to your work ----- especially if you are a visual learner (Figs. 5/6)

15. Multiple Intelligences --- How do you learn best ; What is your preferred learning style ?

16. “Muttering” is good ---- talk to yourself out loud.

17. Timing --- when do you learn best ?

18. Choose two or three words per paragraph ; make a mini story out of them.

19. Kinaesthetic !! --- actors move around/mime when they learn scripts.

20. Cover --- Write --- Check.

21. Whatever works for you --- do it !!

Career Pathways

Studying a language at GCSE allows students to be able to conduct themselves in range of situations in the target language country, as well as increasing their cultural awareness of traditions and customs in countries where the language is spoken.
Taking a GCSE in a modern foreign language also allows students to continue their studies at A-level. A-level languages provide a much more in-depth knowledge of both the language and the culture, preparing students for potential further education at degree level, or ready to continue their language use in the workplace.
Recently, we have begun to offer students at A-level the possibility of taking part in a week’s work experience abroad, through Blue Stamp Travel. Students specify their areas of interest in terms of future work and they are matched to an appropriate workplace in France on Germany, depending on the language studied.
Studying a foreign language can open up many career opportunities – these are so wide-ranging they are hard to list. Careers in engineering, logistics, hospitality, finance, education are all common pathways for linguists though there are also many more avenues.

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